T-shirt: Giv us a bitta dat luh!

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Phonetics-wise, this T-shirt has really caught my eye. It is an interesting one, ain’t it? And the coolest thing about it is that it is all based on the sounds of these words.

So, let’s not talk a lot and go straight to the meanings!!

1.  Giv – It is actually how you pronounce the verb “give” since we all know that the “e” at the very end is silent.

2. A bitta – That expression is how you pronounce “a bit of”. You can find  this reduction in many other examples. The sound of the preposition “of” /əv/ is usually reduced to the schwa /ə/. So instead of saying “get out OF here” you will sound like “get outta here” or rather than saying “You should’ve told me” you’d sound like “you shoulda told me”.

For further information on the reduction of /əv/, I recommend this video below by Rachel’s English:

Also, if you understand Portuguese, you should definitely watch the video by professional Carina Fragozo from English in Brazil. This video will surely help you see where and how to pronounce the SCHWA /ə/ 

3. Dat – This is nothing but the demonstrative pronoun “that”, however the “th” which, in this case, is represented by /ð/ is sometimes pronounced as /d/.

4. Luh – It is how some people pronounce the word “love”. We know that the “e” is silent and the “o” is represented by the sound of /ʌ/ which is usually represent by the letter “u” in English such as in “but” or “further”. In Southern English and in Black Southern, the “v” is silent as well.

Well, enough information for you to understand the sentence on the Tee.

In conclusion: “Giv us a bitta dat luh” means “Give us a bit of that love!”

In Portuguese: “De-me um pouco daquele amor!” ou “ Me mostre aquele amor que voce sabe dar!”

So, yeah, time to dash off. Do you know other ways to say “Giv us a bitta dat luh”?
How do you say it in your language?

This material has been selected, analyzed, and put together by Rodrigo P. Honorato

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